Council seeks views on updated speed management strategy

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Cheshire East Council is urging residents to share their views on the authority's updated draft speed management strategy.

The document, which is being finalised in consultation with partners including Cheshire police who are responsible for speed enforcement across the borough, is now out for public consultation.

The strategy aims to provide a safer road environment for all by setting out how speed is managed on the borough's roads.

The document includes guidance about the way the council manages speed, while also considering the changing attitudes towards traffic management and speed, particularly since the pandemic, when people's habits and priorities changed. It also supports the council's 'active travel' priority, which aims to encourage more walking and cycling to help deliver on the authority's carbon neutral targets.

Councillor Craig Browne, deputy leader of Cheshire East Council and chair of its highways and transport committee, said: "The strategy identifies how we intend to ensure safe and efficient travel by managing speed across the borough with a focus on the three Es of education, enforcement and engineering.

"I would also like to point to the importance of three other Es: to empower, enable and encourage. And that is why this consultation is so important – and why people should get involved and share their views on this strategy.

"The public consultation is an opportunity to comment on the strategy, which is used to manage speed and, importantly, help people to feel safe – including those walking and cycling to get around. So, get involved and take part in the consultation."

The consultation is about the overall approach to managing speed – not the merits of existing speed limits on specific roads. More information can be found at: www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/consultations.

To comment on the strategy, complete the survey at: https://surveys.cheshireeast.gov.uk/s/SpeedManagementStrategyConsultation/

The survey closes at midnight on 31 January 2022. The council will then analyse the feedback and modify the strategy, if required before being submitted for approval and adoption by the council in summer 2022.

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Comments

Here's what readers have had to say so far. Why not add your thoughts below.

Pippa Jones
Wednesday 1st December 2021 at 4:38 pm
I found this strategy quite confusing to read and sounds as if it has been written by engineers without any input from road users. So many of us use the roads in different ways, whether as drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, children, people with mobility issues, wheelchair users, people with neuro-diversity, people with dementia, people with learning difficulties; driving through or going to the shops or to school. Roads are for all of us and I didn't get a sense of that from this consultation. I like Craig's alternative 3 E's (empower, enable and encourage) and would add equity, environment and engagement. We have a climate crisis and a health crisis; fewer of us in cars and more of us having the confidence to walk or cycle (or e-bike) on some of our journeys would help with both our health and wellbeing and the climate crisis.
So I would encourage everyone to respond to this consultation; it's really important that as many people as possible, however they use the roads, let CEC know what they think.
Brian Fox
Tuesday 18th January 2022 at 6:07 pm
The end date for the consultation is rapidly approaching. At Transition Wilmslow we think the document is a wasted opportunity, fails to address the concerns of local residents on the speed of traffic and is not fit for purpose.

We think the speed management strategy must be fundamentally changed to
1) Acknowledge the centrality of traffic speed to the use of public space, including quality of life as well as collisions, injuries and deaths
2) Put the needs of vulnerable road users, children and the adoption of active travel central to the management of speed.
3) Set out measures and a timescale to effect a systematic reduction in speeds of motorised traffic in residential areas, including but not limited to the adoption of a 20mph speed limit as the norm in residential roads.

Read our response here, and please respond to the consultation with your own views

https://transitionwilmslow.co.uk/20s-plenty-for-us/

(the consultation questions themselves are rather confusing, and focus on particular parts of what is a 49 page document, but it is also possible to give an overview response of what you want on speed management just by email)

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